Risk of testosterone supplements

The second theory is similar and is known as "evolutionary neuroandrogenic (ENA) theory of male aggression". [77] [78] Testosterone and other androgens have evolved to masculinize a brain in order to be competitive even to the point of risking harm to the person and others. By doing so, individuals with masculinized brains as a result of pre-natal and adult life testosterone and androgens enhance their resource acquiring abilities in order to survive, attract and copulate with mates as much as possible. [77] The masculinization of the brain is not just mediated by testosterone levels at the adult stage, but also testosterone exposure in the womb as a fetus. Higher pre-natal testosterone indicated by a low digit ratio as well as adult testosterone levels increased risk of fouls or aggression among male players in a soccer game. [79] Studies have also found higher pre-natal testosterone or lower digit ratio to be correlated with higher aggression in males. [80] [81] [82] [83] [84]

For guys without hypogonadism, a wait-and-see approach may make the most sense. "We just don't have the data to prove that raising testosterone in men who already have normal levels confers any real benefit," says Dr. Robert Mordkin , a urologist in Arlington, Virginia. Furthermore, Mordkin adds, "Natural waxes and wanes of testosterone as we age may have some not yet entirely understood protective effects." In addition to making us better fathers, as the Northwestern study infers, declining testosterone "may lower our vulnerability to prostate cancer at a time in our lives when we're at the greatest risk for it." That said, if you have classic symptoms of hypogonadism – low libido, fatigue, erectile dysfunction – "it's probably reasonable to check your testosterone. And for those guys whose blood levels come under definitions of low testosterone, it's probably reasonable to try the therapy for a while. But that's very different from saying testosterone is the fountain of youth."

The researchers say use of testosterone therapy -- taken by mouth, gel patch, or injection to treat "low T" -- has skyrocketed in the past decade. Its popularity is a consequence, experts say, of an aging "boomer" population and heavy drug industry marketing, and has come about despite its unknown, long-term health risks. According to some surveys, use of testosterone therapy has more than tripled since 2001, with more than 2 percent of American men in their 40s and nearly 4 percent of men in their 60s taking it. Testosterone levels drop naturally by about 1 percent per year in men past their 30s.

Risk of testosterone supplements

risk of testosterone supplements

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