What affects testosterone levels

This one-two punch of decreasing testosterone and increasing cortisol blunts the status drive. Scientists believe humans, as well as other animals, evolved this response as a survival mechanism. If an animal gets beaten in a status competition, it won’t do him any good to keep fighting over and over just to get squashed again and again. Better to just retreat to his cave, lick his wounds, and live to fight another day. What’s interesting is while the cortisol response to status defeat occurs in both men and women, it’s much stronger in men , particularly when the status is achievement related. We’ll discuss why that is in a later article in this series about the evolution of status.

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  1. Andres Solis April 23, 2014 at 10:54 AM Great stuff!

    Finding himself unable to perform was an alarming first for him. When Evans, a retiree who lives in Amherst, Ohio, told his doctor, he received a prescription for Viagra. That didn't help. At a follow-up appointment, he had some blood work done. It showed that his testosterone level had tanked, likely a side effect of one of the post-transplant medications he was taking. This time, his doctor sent him to a urologist, who prescribed a testosterone skin patch to boost the levels of the hormone in his blood. He's now been using patches for about five months.

    Estrogen depletion can bring on a combination of hormonal and biochemical fluctuations that can lead to changes in your brain and nervous system. You may experience mood swings, memory loss, problems focusing, irritability, fatigue, hot flashes, night sweats, stress, anxiety and depression. Physical symptoms, such as hot flashes, mixed with cognitive changes, such as irritability and memory loss, can create more opportunities for emotional changes and mood swings, although no research to date shows a direct link to depression due to menopause. Some researchers believe that estrogen depletion can affect your memory and may impact one's risk for the development of Alzheimer's disease, but more research is needed.

    What affects testosterone levels

    what affects testosterone levels

    Estrogen depletion can bring on a combination of hormonal and biochemical fluctuations that can lead to changes in your brain and nervous system. You may experience mood swings, memory loss, problems focusing, irritability, fatigue, hot flashes, night sweats, stress, anxiety and depression. Physical symptoms, such as hot flashes, mixed with cognitive changes, such as irritability and memory loss, can create more opportunities for emotional changes and mood swings, although no research to date shows a direct link to depression due to menopause. Some researchers believe that estrogen depletion can affect your memory and may impact one's risk for the development of Alzheimer's disease, but more research is needed.

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